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Creating S-P-A-C-E in Term 2

Time for a great article from Aziza Green:

I made a big decision before we moved to our new place. I believe this one decision has given us back 15 to 25 hours  a week back in productivity and rest, and more s-p-a-c-e.

We gave up living with a TV in the house.

Sounds so simple… silly even, but this one decision has changed our lives. I can’t rave about this lifestyle choice enough! I’m not out to convince anyone to get rid of their TV, but let me just rave a little bit more about it before you dismiss me as a lentil-loving-hippie.

Greater productivity

Okay, I’m not saying I get home from work and write 2000 words a day (although occasionally I do) or that I’ve become some kind of supreme being (although I can see the similarities), but I’ve found that I take care of business like I never did when I had the TV on. I have the energy and motivation to clean more, to take care of my nails, to plan ahead so that I don’t miss things/events/parties. What I’m saying is, I clear my mind and clear my to-do list, so that when my writing day or the weekend comes I have the head space to get stuff done.

Also, in the absence of a TV, I’ve remembered all the books I have in our book shelf. I started reading more fiction and more of things I’ve always been interested in like psychology, history, art and more. I even started reading some of my husband’s books about finance and business, which I previously would not have touched if my life depended on it. My brain feels challenged, full and hungry all at the same time!

Rest

I never found watching TV restful. Often I would switch off the TV and feel agitated, restless, over stimulated and bored. Watching TV doesn’t challenge your brain nor does it give it a chance to process what’s happened in the day. It’s pure distraction, an opportunity to zone out and be entertained without expending any mental energy.

At first, when we went TV-less, I found that my head would freak out when I got home at the end of the work day. I would feel bored and overwhelmed with my own thoughts. It took a while to get past that.

Now to unwind I make a peppermint tea and sit quietly, or my husband & I talk about our days (who knew he was so interesting!), or I read, or I cook something delicious to share together. By the time I’m ready to bed, I feel like I’ve had a full day of hours. I feel rested and ready to sleep.

Space

We have more physical space in our home. We live in a two bedroom apartment – space is a precious commodity for us! Instead of a TV as the focus of our living room we have a big window that looks out to some trees, blue sky and a little bit of the ocean if you lean to the left and squint a little. The result is a living room that seems bigger, brighter, uncluttered and peaceful. There’s also the metaphoric space, which I’ve already mentioned. I’m not exaggerating when I say I have sent entire Saturday mornings and Sunday afternoons lying on our sofa and staring out of that big window. When Monday comes I feel like I’ve had a good break and I’m ready for the new week.

Also that lack of constant advertising means that I no longer want more clothes, kitchen utensils, gadgets, snuggies, those porcelain dolls that you paint the face onto – thus the entire house has less stuff in it too. Funny that.

Not sure what we’ll do when we have kids old enough to care about things like TV, but I’m kinda hoping that a lack of TV will drive said future kids to pursue other enriching activities. To be seen I guess.

Okay I’m done raving. I know I said I wasn’t going to try to convince anyone to give it up, but I’ve just changed my mind. If you are lacking in productivity, rest and space you should give up your TV for a while and see if it makes a difference. It does take some adjusting to, but you’ll soon find better ways to occupy your precious free time. Maybe salsa dancing classes, more varied reading, more laughter, more dinners together, more life outside the box (see what I did there?)

How do you create more space for what is important?

Posted by Mathew Green on May 02, 2017  /   Posted in Uncategorized

8 Must-Do’s For New School Leaders

Here is another brilliant article from Megan Dredge. When I read this article I was actually in the process of writing on a similar topic. I stopped… and decided to focus on Megan’s article instead. She is a brilliant leader, both inside and outside of the classroom, and I can’t think of anyone better to speak on the topic.

Enter Megan:

Taking on a new leadership role is an admirable venture. Many teachers aspire to a leadership responsibility and look forward to a season of new beginnings. Learning to juggle your new leadership role can be exciting and rewarding, and can sometimes be challenging and overwhelming. Here are 8 strategies to help you be a great leader in your school.

1. Clarify what’s expected of you

As a leader, ask lots of questions about what is expected of you and get clarity on your role. Knowing what your goals are and what you are aiming to achieve is the most crucial step in getting your leadership journey off to a good start.

2. Get to know your team

The people you are leading want to know that you genuinely care about them and that you are genuinely interested in them. Take notice of what is going on in their world and always be looking for opportunities to learn something new about your team members.

3. Encourage team members’ strengths

As you build genuine relationships with your team, you will learn what they are good at and what they are passionate about. A great leader knows the strengths of their team members and gives them opportunities to use them.

4. Be a good follower

If you want your team members to follow you then be a good example. Show them how you are part of a greater team (your ‘boss’ or the person you report to) and how you are committed to that greater team.

5. Confront when appropriate

Great leaders know how to have a difficult conversation. There will be times when you need to confront a team member – as a leader, do it with kindness and fairness.

6. Say sorry

Great leaders are humble enough to admit their mistakes and to actually say sorry. Be a leader who shows your team members that you too are on a learning journey and that it is ok to make mistakes and admit when you are wrong.

7. Encourage ongoing professional development

I’m sure you have heard it said that leaders are learners. It is absolutely true. A great leader is always growing and developing and enthusiastically encourages his or her team to engage in regular Professional Development.

8. Have an open door policy

Be approachable. Make it easy for your team to come and talk to you. Don’t hide in your office or behind your desk. Keep your door open and welcome conversation from your team members. Help them feel at ease when they talk to you and do the hard work to make every conversation productive and useful.

This week’s assignment:

As a leader in your school, choose one of these 8 strategies and really focus on it in your interactions with your team members this week.

Enjoy the journey,

And more importantly,

Enjoy the moments.

:)

Megan

 

Posted by Mathew Green on April 29, 2017  /   Posted in Uncategorized

Do you remember being in school?

Do you remember being in school? When I was in primary school I remember being obsessed with transformers, The Spice Girls and rollerblading .. I was slightly overweight, pale skinned and short  and I  cared deeply about the opinions of the ‘popular kids’  and strived to please my teachers.

I remember one day in the playground telling my Year 3 teacher, Mrs Richards, that a group of students wouldn’t let me play with them. They were being mean and calling me names. Mrs. Richards stopped her conversation with one of her colleagues and shooed me away. I persisted, and told her my traumatic tale again, and once again she shooed me away with a waving hand.

At that time in my life being accepted by my friends was a big deal – in fact, it was my world. Mrs. Richards was a great teacher; passionate, kind and dedicated; yet in that moment she was busy, probably tired and disinterested. I walked away from that moment feeling hurt and more lonely than ever.

Sure, I got over it eventually, but I wonder how often we let our students down because we’re  busy or distracted by tasks that should come second to our students. As teachers we have a unique opportunity to help our students feel heard, significant and special. We need to get into their wonderful worlds so that we can truly engage with them.

Here are some ways to engage in more meaningful ways with your students:

  • When you on playground duty be present. Playground duty can be chore, or you can look at it as a wonderful opportunity to connect with your students outside of the classroom.
  • Emphasise with your students. Their concerns may seem minor to you now, but think back to when you were their age. What was important to you? Just watch the faces of your students light up when you actively participate in their lives.
  • Be interruptible.  You didn’t get into teaching to hide in the staff room or to diversify your photocopying skills. No matter how busy you are, whatever task  ‘must’ be done, you have to allow students to interrupt you.

Don’t underestimate how powerful your words and actions are in the lives of young people. By taking a little bit of time each day, you can step inside the wonderful world of your class. A world full of imagination, friendship drama and infinite possibilities.

Posted by Mathew Green on February 26, 2017  /   Posted in Uncategorized
Whether you’re a casual teacher, permanently employed, working as a support teacher or on a temporary contract with your school, you are directly involved in educating, training and shaping some of the greatest minds that this world is yet to see.
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